Blog Archives

Friday, July 20, 2012 at 10:59 am


Allen Chiu’s “Untitled 412″ was taken on a deserted street in Providence, R.I.

The Teen Portrait Competition (TPC), a collaboration between the New Learning Institute and the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, was created by and for young people.

Saturday, March 03, 2012 at 12:46 pm

Diana Rhoten of Startl kicked off the MacArthur Foundation's DML 2012 conference in San Francisco on March 1st with a bold challenge: have audacious goals. For this group of practitioners, researchers, and other interested stakeholders, pushing for rich learning experiences that allow learners to explore, create, experiment, iterate, and collaborate, we have to be audacious: for all of the fawning over Finland's and Singapore's educational successes (where testing is far less frequent and is used to facilitate student learning, not punish schools), our educational policy is still clutching standardized tests and back-to-basics drill-and-kill pedagogies--despite the fact that research tells us these are not effective practices.

Friday, October 07, 2011 at 12:00 am

By Jeff Meade, Mobile Learning Program Lead


Local pre-k teacher, Cassidy Martinez, gathers digital resources in the museum for a creative story using Glogster.

Thursday, August 18, 2011 at 4:02 pm

I’m packing my bags, and this Sunday, I’m getting on a plane to move from San Francisco, CA to Cambridge, MA to get my master’s degree in education at Harvard Graduate School of Education as part of the Technology, Innovation, and Education program. I’m not leaving the New Learning Institute behind, though—I’m taking the NLI along with me. Starting the first week of September, I’ll be blogging about the concepts, people, theories, and policies from my program of study as they apply to New Learning. Get an inside line to how one of the nation’s top education schools explores transforming practice, research, and policy through innovating where and how we teach and learn.

Friday, August 05, 2011 at 1:29 pm

This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in the third and final part of the interview, she discusses how different communities bring different behavioral norms into the online spaces.

Listen to the full interview here, with bonus content about how youth and adults view online bullying differently. danah shares two cases from her extensive field study to illustrate how young people deal with online drama.

 

Thursday, July 21, 2011 at 11:07 am

KQED Pearson

This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in excerpts from Part II of the interview, she discusses how young people control private information in public online spaces by “hiding in plain sight.”

Friday, July 15, 2011 at 12:02 pm


I was pretty excited when I got my Google+ invitation last week. I might have fist-bumped the air, and just perhaps I crowed a little on Facebook by offering invitations to my friends. The flood of answering excitement never came. Two people asked for invites, and more asked, “What the heck is Google+?” My two invites aren’t posting much of anything. Even my generally tech-savvy supervisor wanted a rundown.

To say it’s Google’s answer to Facebook is the short explanation. The interface definitely shares some strong similarities at first blush. There’s a posting box that allows you to share web links, videos, photos, or your location. There’s an activity feed and suggestions of folks you might want to add. All this works and is great.

Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 12:02 pm


This post is part of a series of interviews highlighting leaders in the field of New Learning (what we call “NLI at Inquiry”). Recently, we interviewed danah boyd—Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, Visiting Researcher at Harvard University’s Law School, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales—on subjects including how youth develop online identities, social norms, and privacy issues. Here, in excerpts from Part I of the interview, she discusses how youth navigate online privacy issues.

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